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Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Health Hazard of Operating ULR (Ultra Long Range) flights

Article contributed by "Maserati" a former cabin crew:


Joshua was an IFS in his early 50s operating the original ultra long haul non-stop flights between Singapore and USA back in the day.  He was an average albeit loyal employee who spent more than 30 years in the airline.  It was his first and only employer since he embarked on his working life.  It was Lunar New Year so Joshua’s crew were looking forward to completing the return flight from Los Angeles to Singapore and reuniting with their loved ones at home.  The crew were in high spirits as they went about their pre-boarding duties.  Joshua started to feel unwell as he worked but kept it to himself to avoid spoiling the upbeat mood.  The flight took off without incident and the aircraft levelled-off so drinks service  could commence.  Joshua was walking out of the galley carrying a drink order when he suddenly collasped in full view of concerned passengers.  The Chief Steward, Maniam immediately went to Joshua’s aid, gathering a few Stewards to help Joshua into the crew bunk.  Joshua was showing the classic symptoms of  a stroke.  Taking Joshua’s condition into consideration, it was decided to divert the flight to Hawaii, where he can deplane to receive medical attention.  He was warded in a Hawaiian hospital and the airline arranged for his wife to fly to his bedside.  Joshua continued his rehabilitation diligently at home in Singapore with the goal of resuming his flying job.  After a few months, his medical leave ended and his doctor declared him fit to return to work.  However, after evaluation by his airline management, Joshua was deemed unfit to fly.  He spend his days up till his retirement doing administrative duties in the cabin crew office.

This is one of the numerous documented and undocumented cases of cabin crew suffering from all kinds of health problems from operating ultra long haul flights.  When the airlines first ceased these flight in 2013, rumour had it that one of the reasons was that the airline wanted to avoid facing a class action suit by the affected cabin crew.  

3 comments:

Hazardous nature of flying said...

How else can these guys make a living?

Choices are limited depending on qualifications, experience and age.

Ownself must take care of ownself.

Anonymous said...

Class action?

In Singapore?.. ha! ha!.. the union will protect the employer lah.
Time for the union to scratch employer's back you know.!
Employers are fearless people... absolutely not a single cardiac muscle.

Anonymous said...

What class action? The company takes care of the hospitalisation bill.